Ballistic measurement systems: measuring projectile’s end velocity (1972)

Measuring projectile’s end velocity (1972)

This measuring device determines a projectile’s velocity at the location of an imaginary target at a great distance from the cannon. The spread of the projectiles at this distance is great. The system was therefore designed with a large detection field in mind. In 1972, this measuring device was handed over to the Commission of Trials of the Royal Netherlands Army.

The measuring device consists of two optical units, each containing three optical detectors with contiguous fan-shaped detection fields, and an amplifier unit. The three optical detectors per unit are necessary to obtain a detection beam of approx. 90° opening angle. The two optical units are provided with directional means so that the two detection beams can be arranged in parallel. With the units at a mutual distance of for instance 20 meters, the flight times of the projectile are measured with two time-interval meters (counters t1 and t2) (see diagram).

Ballistic measuring projectile's end velocity (1972)
Ballistic measuring projectile’s end velocity (1972)

The printout converter or PRICO supplies the measurement data to a telex. The projectile velocity can be determined from the measurement data.

Schematic design of the end velocity measurements
Schematic design of the end velocity measurements

 

In July 1979, one of the end velocity detectors was hit in Petten by a 25 mm projectile
In July 1979, one of the end velocity detectors was hit in Petten by a 25 mm projectile

 

Control Unit
Control Unit

 

The interior of the vehicle with the optical measuring systems, e.g. the amplifier unit of the end velocity meter. At the right the print-out converter rack (PRICO4) with the counters or the time interval meters
The interior of the vehicle for the optical measuring systems, e.g. the amplifier unit of the end velocity meter. At the right the print-out converter rack (PRICO4) with the counters or the time interval meters